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Various - Sloppy Seconds - A Collection Of Naughty, Double-Entendre R&B Recordings From The 1950's mp3 track

Various - Sloppy Seconds - A Collection Of Naughty, Double-Entendre R&B Recordings From The 1950's mp3 track

MP3 1441 mb. | FLAC 1507 mb. | WMA 1154 mb.

Performer: Various
Title: Sloppy Seconds - A Collection Of Naughty, Double-Entendre R&B Recordings From The 1950's
Style: Rhythm & Blues
Category: Blues
Rating: 4.6 ✦
Other format: MP2 AUD FLAC MP3 MOD DXD VQF

Tracklist

A1 The Dominoes Sixty Minute Man
A2 The Checkers Don't Stop Dan
A3 The Du Droppers Can't Do Sixty No More
A4 Jesse Powell With Fluffy Hunter The Walkin' Blues
A5 Bull Moose Jackson I Want A Bowlegged Woman
A6 The Duchess The Monkey
A7 Dave Bartholomew My Ding-A-Ling
A8 Mildred Jones Mister Thrill
A9 The Toppers Let Me Bang Your Box
B1 The 5 Royales Laundermat Blues
B2 Wynonie Harris Keep On Churnin'
B3 Julia Lee My Man Stands Out
B4 The Sultans Lemon Squeezing Daddy
B5 The Four Barons Lemon Squeezer
B6 Dinah Washington Long John Blues
B7 Dorothy Ellis Drill Daddy Drill
B8 The Swallows It Ain't The Meat
B9 Bull Moose Jackson Big Ten Inch Record

Dancing In Darkness: EBM, Black Synth & Dark Beats From The 80's (LP) Various Artists. Cosmic Discotheque: 12 Junkshop Disco Funk Gems from the 70s (LP) Various Artists. Songs Of Aretha (LP) Various Artists. Songs Of Aretha (CD) Various Artists. Complete Original Hits of the '60s & '70s (CD) Conway Twitty. Sloppy Seconds: A Collection of Naughty, Double-Entendre R&B Recordings from the 1950s (LP) Various Artists. Sloppy Seconds: A Collection of Naughty, Double-Entendre R&B Recordings from the 1950s (LP).

This article includes an overview of the major events and trends in popular music in the 1950s. Various genre in the First World, rock and roll, doo-wop, pop, swing, rhythm and blues, blues, Country music, rockabilly, and jazz music dominated and defined the decade's music. Rock and roll dominated popular music in the mid 1950s and late 1950s, and quickly spread to much of the rest of the world.

A double entendre (/ɒ̃ˈtɒ̃d(rə)/; French: ) is a figure of speech or a particular way of wording that is devised to be understood in two ways, having a double meaning. Typically one of the meanings is obvious, given the context, whereas the other may require more thought

Jay-Z's 50 Best Double Entendres. If the man says something is a double entendre, it will be remembered in culture as such, and we're okay with giving him that pass. Every line Hov's mistakenly labeled a "double entendre" is still an example of high-level wordplay that's worth knowing about, no matter what umbrella it technically falls under.

These stunning photographs of Hong Kong in the 1950s are captured beautifully by a teenager. Ho Fan who arrived from Shanghai in 1949. The streets, filled with vendors, coolies and rickshaw drivers, fascinated Ho. Taking pictures in a studio was the norm then, but the Ho was more interested in random, candid shots of strangers. His targets, however, did not always smile into the lens of his Rolleiflex. But it is great street photography that gives a peek into daily life in Hong Kong at that time. The photography is part of his book A Hong Kong Memoir.

Including a clutch of hip-hop/R&B crossover anthems, The Very Best of Pure R&B has a bizarre title but a winning tracklisting. The two-disc set features some of the best R&B tracks of the '90s and early 2000s - Blackstreet's "No Diggity," Ginuwine's "Pony," OutKast's "Ms. Jackson," Jay-Z's "Hard Knock Life (Ghetto Anthem)," and even Afroman's "Because I Got High

A double-entendre is a phrase or figure of speech that could have two meanings or that could be understood in two different ways. Innocent or innocuous. Tawdry, bawdy or has some sexual overtone. There are many examples of double-entendre found in literature and in life. In fact, even William Shakespeare and Chaucer used double-entendres. Double-entendre has been found in literature, movies and daily speech every since. Some other examples of double-entendre include: Mercutio's line from William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet: Tis no less, I tell you; for the bawdy hand of the dial is now upon the prick of noon. Charles Dickens character in Oliver Twist named Charley Bates but frequently referred to as Master Bates (the term masturbate was already in use when Dickens wrote Oliver Twist and had the same meaning then as it does today).

The entendre gets an extra little push of double when it's couched in the innocent motion of doo-wop. Bessie Smith, "I Need a Little Sugar in My Bowl". As popular as meat may be, the sugary stuff is even more so. Bessie Smith starts out like she's singing one of her great mournful blues numbers, but she soon gets into the growling, moaning spirit of double entendre. I need a little mmm-hmmm" speaks for itself. Lux Interior does his Elvis impersonation on a cracked retro-rockabilly double entendre that I'm pretty sure Elvis wouldn't have wanted any part of. "I myself believe in whatever comes in handy," indeed. Roy Brown, "Cadillac Baby". You'd think there would be an infinite number of double entendre songs about cars, but I found fewer than you'd expect (not counting songs about sex in cars, of course).

Country music is the most popular genre of music and its popularity stems from classic country songs such as these from the 1950s that have paved the way for other, more current artists. The country songs of the 1950s are steeped in Americana and tell the story of ordinary, hard working, hard.

Before then an album was a set of 3 or 4 78s in a booklet form. The first rock albums started to appear around 1955. Most early rock albums were merely collections of songs that had previously been released on singles.