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Wailers, The - Burnin' mp3 track

Wailers, The - Burnin' mp3 track

MP3 1150 mb. | FLAC 1966 mb. | WMA 1244 mb.

Performer: Wailers, The
Title: Burnin'
Released: 1973
Style: Roots Reggae
Category: Reggae
Rating: 4.1 ✦
Other format: MP4 WMA MPC VOC TTA MP2 ASF

Burnin' is the sixth studio album by Jamaican reggae band The Wailers, released in October 1973. It was written mostly by bandleader Bob Marley and produced by Chris Blackwell. A commercial and critical success in the United States, Burnin' was certified Gold and later added to the National Recording Registry, with the Library of Congress deeming it historically and culturally significant.

Burnin' is the sixth studio album by the reggae band The Wailers, released in October 1973. The sixth album by Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer (the last before Tosh and Bunny departed for solo careers and the band became known as Bob Marley and the Wailers), Burnin' opens with a signature song, the call to action "Get Up, Stand Up" and includes a more confrontational and militant tone than previous records, such as in another Marley standard. In 2003, the album was ranked number 319 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. American singer Lauryn Hill's album cover for her debut The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill was inspired by the album cover of Burnin' Burnin'. Studio album by. The Wailers.

Template:Use Jamaican English Template:Use dmy dates. Burnin' is a reggae album by The Wailers, released in 1973.

Burnin is a roots reggae album by The Wailers, released in 1973 (see 1973 in music). The fourth album by Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer (the last before Tosh and Bunny departed for solo careers and the band became known as Bob Marley & the Wailers), "Burnin opens with a signature song, the call to action "Get Up, Stand Up" and includes a more confrontational and militant tone than previous records, such as in another Marley standard turned. In 2007 the album was added to the Library of Congress' National Recording Registry for its historical and cultural significance.

The Wailers' fourth album overall, Burnin', was their second for Island Records, released only six months after its predecessor, Catch a Fire. Given that speed, it's not surprising that several tracks - "Put It On," "Small Axe," and "Duppy Conqueror" - are re-recordings of songs dating back a few years. The confrontational nature of the group's message is apparent immediately in the opening track, "Get Up, Stand Up," as stirring a song as any that emerged from the American Civil Rights movement a decade before. The Wailers are explicit in their call to violence, a complete reversal from their own 1960s "Simmer Down" philosophy

The album’s almost-title track ‘Burnin’ And Lootin’’ promised a full-scale riot. Powered by Aston Family Man Barrett’s supremely melodic bass line and brother Carlton Barrett’s one-drop drum beat, the song had a groove that hovered somewhere between a funeral march and an all-night shebeen. The melody was mournful, the tone full of anger and regret as Marley pondered his people’s predicament: All that we got, it seems we have lost. With the encouragement of Blackwell, Marley emerged once again as the primary singing and songwriting voice of the Wailers on Burnin’. Dissatisfactions among the founders built up during a schedule which took them to America for the first time.