» » Rev. Dave Bailey With Musical Memories From The Hopefuls - A Ranch Called Hope / The Exceptional Child
Rev. Dave Bailey With Musical Memories From The Hopefuls  - A Ranch Called Hope / The Exceptional Child mp3 track

Rev. Dave Bailey With Musical Memories From The Hopefuls - A Ranch Called Hope / The Exceptional Child mp3 track

MP3 1917 mb. | FLAC 1476 mb. | WMA 1392 mb.

Performer: Rev. Dave Bailey
Title: A Ranch Called Hope / The Exceptional Child
Style: Gospel
Category: World, Folk, Country
Rating: 4.6 ✦
Other format: MP1 AA APE AC3 DMF MMF AHX

Tracklist

A Ranch Called Hope
A1 Ranch Hope Story 11:50
A2 Heaven Came Down 2:57
A3 It's A Wonderful Day 2:00
A4 A Bit Of Heaven 1:43
The Exceptional Child
B1 The Exceptional Child 7:54
B2 Deeper And Deeper 3:52
B3 I Asked The Lord 2:44
B4 Peace Like A River 2:29

Bash! (also released as Modern Mainstream) is an album by jazz drummer Dave Bailey which was originally released on the Jazzline label in 1961. Different releases of the same material have appeared under the names of sidemen on the date. The album features pianist Tommy Flanagan and was re-released as Tommy Flanagan Trio And Sextet on the Onyx label and on the Xanadu label in 1973

Samuel David Bailey (born February 22, 1926) is an American jazz drummer. Born in Portsmouth, Virginia, Bailey studied drumming in New York City at the Music Center Conservatory after serving in the . Air Force during World War II. He played with Herbie Jones from 1951–53 and later with Johnny Hodges, Charles Mingus, Lou Donaldson, Curtis Fuller, Billy Taylor, Art Farmer, Ben Webster, and Horace Silver

At age 12 Dave was finally rescued and placed in a series of foster homes until he enlisted in the . Air Force at age 18. Even with all that was against him, Dave was determined to better himself - no matter what the odds. Pelzer's portrayal of domestic tyranny and eventual escape is unforgettable, but falls short of providing understanding of extreme abuse or how he made his journey from "Victim to Victor.

When Beth arrives in Washington, .  . I found The Hopefuls to be a really enjoyable and fun read. Jennifer Close really hits all of the right notes about the culture and interpersonal dynamics in Washington, and what it's like for an outsider looking in. Even things that may seem outlandish to those unfamiliar with the city had me nodding and even laughing out loud a time or two. (I can actually recall having a conversation with friends about how many of the Safeway grocery stores in DC have nicknames-the Social Safeway, the Soviet Safeway, et. so it was funny seeing that in the book